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Why Consider Adding Shop Classes Back into High Schools?

Lots of folks have different opinions about the nature of a quality education. For instance, some people narrowly define their expectations for high school students when they design academic standards and programs. Though new programs get justified by claiming they help make graduates employable, they may only concentrate on building a tight set of academic skills that are needed to get accepted to a four-year college.

While everybody values this sort of academic readiness, it’s also important to make certain that many students have skills and experiences that will help them find employment right after high school. Every student won’t choose college. Even many of those who do pursue higher education can benefit from more hands-on training and experiences during their high school years.

Why Reintroduce on Shop Classes in High School?

The American workplace needs skilled workers with vocational training as much as it needs students who are prepared for college or graduate school. In fact, it’s not impossible to argue that traditional classes like home economics and shop provide useful educational opportunities for all kinds of students. However, the sensible path to grooming the next generation of people who are competent inside and outside of their homes may not offer a strong enough defense when public school budgets are tight. Consider some ways that that shop classes can and have been modernized to better suit today’s students.

Modernizing Shop Classes for the 21st Century

Do high school students need to learn traditional skills that shop classes taught? The argument could go either way. In any case, these classes could be modernized to also introduce students to modern manufacturing methods that can serve them well if they end up working in a shop floor or in the engineer’s office. A few years ago, Time Magazine reported that there were almost six million people between 16 and 24 who did not work or attend school. At the same time, companies were begging for skilled labor to employ and advance.

One large problem is the gap between the things that high school students learn and what these companies seek. Manufacturers, for instance, don’t necessarily need to recruit people with two- or four-year degrees. However, they do want to find recruits who have demonstrated some aptitude in their industry. At the very least, these companies need eager recruits that have had enough exposure to know that it’s the type of job they would like to do.

The Time Magazine article mentioned a school that transformed an almost totally unused old shop room into a modern vocational setting. High school students could still learn how to cut vinyl and saw wood, but they also got to experiment with robotics, CNC automation, 3D printers, and other electronics. Not only did these modernized shop classes attract students who wanted vocational shop training, they also became popular with students who had seats in honors math and science classes. In this school, shop classes became popular and valuable places to learn again.

Tag Team Manufacturing is Here for Tomorrows’ Students

Tag Team Manufacturing specializes in CNC manufacturing and automation. As a growing company, they have room for tomorrows’ high school, vocational school, and college graduates. To learn more about how Tag Team Manufacturing values clients and employees, contact them today with your questions.

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